Quick Answer: Do I Need Medicare Part B If I Am Still Working?

What happens if you don’t sign up for Medicare Part B at 65?

If you wait until the month you turn 65 (or the 3 months after you turn 65) to enroll, your Part B coverage will be delayed.

This could cause a gap in your coverage.

In most cases, if you don’t sign up for Medicare Part B when you’re first eligible, you’ll have to pay a late enrollment penalty..

Can I drop my employer health insurance and go on Medicare?

By law, employer group health insurance plans must continue to cover you at any age so long as you continue working. … You would not be on both, meaning that you would not have Medicare premiums deducted from your Social Security payments if you’re still covered by employer health insurance.

When should I sign up for Medicare Part B if I am still working?

You should start your Part B coverage as soon as you stop working or lose your current employer coverage (even if you sign up for COBRA or retiree health coverage from your employer). You have 8 months to enroll in Medicare once you stop working OR your employer coverage ends (whichever happens first).

Is it mandatory to have Medicare Part B?

When Do You Need Medicare Part B? Medicare Part B isn’t a legal requirement, and you don’t need it in some situations. In general, if you’re eligible for Medicare and have creditable coverage, you can postpone Part B penalty-free. Creditable coverage includes the insurance provided to you or your spouse through work.

What happens if you don’t take Medicare Part B?

If you didn’t get Part B when you’re first eligible, your monthly premium may go up 10% for each 12-month period you could’ve had Part B, but didn’t sign up. In most cases, you’ll have to pay this penalty each time you pay your premiums, for as long as you have Part B.

Do I have to sign up for Medicare Part B if I have private insurance?

You Need Sign Up for Medicare Part B. If you are paying for your own insurance, you may think you do not need to sign up for Medicare when you turn 65. … Your Medicare Part B premium may go up 10 percent for each 12-month period that you could have had Medicare Part B, but did not take it.